Connect to Office 365 using PowerShell

In order to manage your Office 365 tenant(s) using PowerShell, there are some pre-requisites required.

      1. Ensure you are running Windows 8.1, Windows 8, or Windows 7.
      2. Make sure you have the .NET Framework 3.51 feature [enabled by default on Windows 8 and up]
      3. Make sure you have the latest updates. It is important to run this after you install .NET Framework 3.51, so you get updates for that in addition to updates for your operating system.
      4. Install the Microsoft Online Services Sign-In assistant. Even though the link provided should work, you should always look up the latest version [see next link].
      5. Install the Windows Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) module for the appropriate version of your operating system.

Once these requirements are installed, you can continue to connect to your tenant using the following function:

 

 

This will set up a connection with your Office 365 tenant and will also connect to the Exchange configuration so you can easily access mail configuration for your tenant.

Happy scripting!

 

 

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Reasons to blog

Blog

As I’m pondering what to write for my first proper techy blog post, I’ve got to thinking about WHY I’ve chosen to blog in the first place.

Learning by doing…

I’m generally a lurker on forums and social media.

Whenever I need something, I go to Google and have a field day trying to find out of someone has had the same issue that I’m experiencing and hopefully someone has solved it for them.

While this is perfectly fine, over the last few months I’ve noticed that participating in the whole “social” world makes you think about PowerShell more, makes you actively work with PowerShell more and basically it gets you more involved, learning by doing.

It might give you perspectives that you’ve never thought about before [there’s multiple ways to Rome..] and just lets you think about issues you might never think about/come across in your normal day of work.

So for me, blogging makes me have to actively think about PowerShell and DO something with it.

Growing by teaching…

Another point for me to start blogging has to do with my lurking again.

I’m on Twitter, but I never used to be actively participating in it… I just read articles tweeted or retweeted by people I followed, but never posted anything.

Until I read the following article by David Sanoy: Be a PowerShell Champion.

I won’t copy the entire contents, but to sum it up:

You don’t need to be the best in PowerShell, but by sharing, teaching, promoting and helping people, you yourself can be a “Champion” of PowerShell within your company/community.

Based on this, with the help of some of my colleagues we started having active tech sessions at work and I gave a presentation on “What is PowerShell” and basically trying to introduce my co-workers to the magic that is.

The amount of people showing up, the reviews, the “high” and all was unexpected to me and really gave me a kick….

I liked teaching people, I liked getting people enthusiastic about something.

Another added bonus was that while preparing for the presentation, I noticed that I had to really KNOW what I was telling them.

Through blogging I’d like to get the same experience, but with a wider audience!

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Info info info….

Re-inventing the wheel can troublesome and tiresome, and on the other hand constantly telling the same story like a broken record can cause motivational issues..

So I’ve decided to make my own little resource page to answer the question “Where to I begin when I want to learn PowerShell?”.

Quickly run over to the new “New to PowerShell” page to find various collected resources that will get you started!

I will try and keep these updated on a regular basis in case something new pops up or in case things change/get outdated.

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