Let’s start over…

Many times over I thought about what I should be blogging about.

PowerShell’s the future and I really like everything PowerShell related, so a theme for the blog was ‘easy’.
However I’m not really a front runner when it comes to IT, so most of the things I’d be playing with have been done before.

I’d get stuck on what to write about, because surely no one would be interested in ‘another basic PowerShell blog’.
Writing doesn’t come naturally to me and English is not my native language, so transferring thoughts to a blog post can be challenging.
Besides that I normally overthink whatever I write, causing a ‘simple’ blog post to take me hours if not days.

What changed?

In 2018 I had a few breakthroughs that jump-started my love for PowerShell again:

All in all, I’m coding more and more again, finding new reasons to look into it and wanting to share my findings with others.

What does this mean for the blog?

Well, besides an updated colour scheme and logo, I want to grow through teaching more and attending/speaking at more seminars.

But I won’t just blog about PowerShell anymore.
I’ll try and write more about various things, such as other technologies I’m playing with [PowerShell related or not], share interesting articles/tweets that I’ve read.

This should mean some posts will be shorter than ‘normal’, but I’m hoping that like with coding,  writing more will help me become a better writer.
Possibly it will even help me create content more easily.

All in all, let’s start writing again 🙂

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Quick Tip – Find available versions on .wim files

Just a quick tip for personal reference [as I keep forgetting it 🙂 ].

You can easily find out which versions of the Windows OS are available on an install.wim file [generally found within a Windows ISO file] using the following command:

This will provide you both the Index number as well as the name of the version.
It can come in handy when using other tools, such as [in my case] Convert-WindowsImage

Happy Scripting! 🙂

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

SCCM: Get-AppUninstallInfo – Easily creating SCCM Applications

New toys!

As mentioned before, I’ve recently started a new assignment, one that required me to design and roll out a System Center Configuration Manager solution for 4 locations.

While that wasn’t too difficult and the configuration was quite straightforward [thanks to my friends at Manning and Google], the biggest challenge came when creating packages to deploy.
Luckily I was quite familiar with packaging and .MSI editing due to various MDT configurations I had made, but the latest “Current Branch” version of SCCM has “Applications”, which are smart packages [pieces of software] which you can deploy, but also uninstall if you want.

Great stuff, exactly what we needed…

The problem

If you don’t have the software in an .MSI format, you will need to manually enter various information in order for it to become “smart”, otherwise the application will only be able to install itself and possibly retry.

What kind of information do we need and where can we find it?

First, we’ll need to install the software we want to package on a dummy/test machine, so we can find certain behaviour of the program, then we need to scour the registry for the following info:

  • The DisplayName
  • The DisplayVersion
  • The UninstallString
  • The Registry Key where this is all located

The Code

Now my solution isn’t “perfect” yet, as currently I KNOW I only have to check x64 machines, but the code can be easily manipulated to do a check on system architecture :

but for now it will do just fine:

Simply start the script, defining the name of the application or part of it and see the magic unfold 🙂

Get-AppUninstallInfo

 

Happy Scripting! 🙂

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail